Bespoke PowerPoint Training – from us to you

by Philippa Leguen de Lacroix, Co-Founder

Bespoke PowerPoint training will help you get good at PowerPoint, and fast. Of course, reaching expert level in anything takes time. And it’s hard to find the right training course for your particular needs.

I expect many of you have heard of the 10,000 hour rule. I have probably logged that time in PowerPoint easily. Not all of it was quality practice though (and I don’t want to be guilty of oversimplifying the rule here).

Certainly, I didn’t do a PowerPoint course to reach my now (admittedly self-proclaimed) expert level. Initially, I was entirely self-taught. Back in 1998 I literally spent days doing complex animations (the office was quiet) but for the era they were quite cutting edge. Or at least I thought so! By today’s standards they were terrible, but I enjoyed the creativity.

Bespoke PowerPoint training course

I next spent many years working in desk top publishing departments within investment banks. They provided 24/7 pitchbook service to the bank employees, and I hotdesked, covered shifts that included evening and graveyard, and had bankers breathing down my neck. Everything was deadline driven and had to follow strict house style. They did provide in-house PowerPoint training, but it very specific to the needs of that industry. However, I became fast, efficient, and finessed a very high attention to detail. But I was also over reliant on client templates, built-in macros, and found my creativity somewhat sapped.

When my friend and co-founder Pani Theodorou and I started our presentation design company in 2009, we again acquired knowledge as we went. There were no bespoke PowerPoint training courses available for the level of design and animation that we wanted. We now lead a team who frequently share tips and tricks to help us all get faster, stronger and more creative in using PowerPoint.

Since our work is of such a high standard, in both design and technicality, our clients are often asking us is we deliver training. We do.

bespoke powerpoint course

Bespoke PowerPoint training courses can cut through all the boring standard elements and get straight to what’s useful and relevant. The smaller the number of participants, the better the quality of the course – especially when attendees are roughly grouped by existing knowledge or ability.

Common themes include wanting to make PowerPoint slides look more “designy”, how to prevent people taking the deck off-brand, and how to save time.

Often when I demo the “reset” button, there’s an audible reaction from the room. A template sounds like it’s going to be a boring thing, but when they are set up correctly, using layouts will save stacks of time and energy: allowing you to focus on the message of your slides, rather than pouring hours down the drain perfecting the aesthetic.

Whether you’d like a course for a small team, or a 1 to 1 session just for you (or someone special!), then get in touch and let us know about your learning needs.

Bespoke PowerPoint training courses for your team – please drop us a line, at hello@presented.co.uk

Design ideas to help you avoid bullet lists

Avoid bullet lists: two before and after slides to give you ideas…

We know that PowerPoint gets a bad rap as a design tool – it does have limitations, but only a bad worker blames their tools. In the right hands, PowerPoint is a great tool. So even when you have to keep all of your text, there are still options.

Hopefully these slides will give you some inspiration:

Avoid bullet lists with sample 1

BEFORE:
This “Technology” slide shows a typical bullet list layout.
It’s a default layout that we see everywhere and is far from
interesting to look at. (It’s also challenging to remember
the content, but that’s another story!)Additionally, the title
of this slide also had very little meaning – until we developed it.

slide20

AFTER:
The new heading and visuals help to lift the slide and
ignite more interest. This particular slide is best delivered in
an email format – simply because there’s still too much text
onscreen for effective presentation delivery.
To present onscreen: we’d recommend using light animation
to control the flow of information. Animation can prevent the
audience from feeling overwhelmed or reading ahead and
getting out of sync with the presenter.

slide22

Avoid bullet lists with sample 2

BEFORE:
Another typical layout. A boring looking list with plenty of
text. (We’ve swapped out the content with Lorem Ipsum).

Before avoid bullet points

AFTER:
The addition of the image creates visual interest, and the
icon for “explore” does a good job of leading the eye to the
action points. It’s still text heavy, and the image is purely
decorative. But for situations where you have to keep your
text – it’s simply better. And there’s nothing here that is
complicated or difficult for anyone using PowerPoint
to reproduce.

With PowerPoint it’s usually the lack of ideas that is the negative driving force behind so many slides.

We hope this gives you a couple of pointers. The principals are easy! But then, we would say that…

Drop us a line if you need any help.

Important Things to Consider While Creating a Product Presentation

Important Things to Consider While Creating a Product Presentation

A product presentation should look simple, appealing and eye-catching to your audience. The presentation should be in the form of an interesting story through the use of format, design and PowerPoint slides that makes it not only effective but also interactive. A specialist in PowerPoint presentation knows these techniques and keeps the slides precise, informative and simple. Such a presentation is appreciated by people and they pay attention to it.

To help your message resonate with the audience, your presentation should focus on visual content and avoid text-heavy slides. A presentation created by presentation designers would be really awesome as they bring many skills:

Visual Aids: They are an important part of your presentation as they compel the audience to pay attention. Professional designers use strategic and relevant visual aids to support the message you’re delivering to your audience.

Templates: The theme of your presentation should be unique. A professional designer uses a theme that matches your product and complements the topic you’re speaking about.

Charts and Graphs: A professionally designed presentation should include data and statistics represented visually which will enhance and support your message by presenting the details in an engaging way that supports your point.

Colour & Font: Professional PowerPoint presentations should have eye-catching colour themes and interpretative fonts. The use of appropriate fonts, different colour shades, and combinations can influence purchasing decisions. The presentation service providers makes your product presentation appear on google by using suitable techniques.

Use of multimedia, animation, videos and visual content in your presentation captures and maintains the audience’s attention, that’s why presentation design specialists are recommended for professional presentations.

Professional PowerPoint designers can help you create a gorgeous presentation for your product. They are very creative and will design a presentation that not only demonstrates your product but also advises the customer on the product and makes the customer willing to buy your product.

There are many presentation service providers but you should select a leading professional presentation designer to create an awesome Powerpoint presentation for your product.

The benefits of a non-linear presentation

The benefits of a non-linear presentation:

A non-linear presentation is a great way to present. Of course, it’s more effective with an appropriate audience size – so for a small meeting, or one-to-one, it’s a brilliant presentation option.

What is a non-linear presentation?

A non-linear presentation simply means that you won’t necessarily start at slide 1 and then proceed to slide 2, 3, 4 etc. The slides will be structured in a similar way to a website – allowing the presenter to respond to their audience’s area of interest by clicking on a topic which is hyperlinked. This allows the presenter to jump to any chosen slide within the deck. And back again, perhaps. Or to drill down into more detail if required. A presenter is also likely to have a more natural delivery and feel less rehearsed when they have the freedom to present a non-linear presentation.

non-linear presentation

Non-linear presentations can increase presentation engagement

Using a hyperlinked presentation also means the presenter can practice active listening, and can intuitively respond to the audience. This encourages the presentation to be more of a dialogue and less of a monologue. Something that will help to keep the audience more engaged, and more likely to participate.

We see trends occur in the presentation industry through the requests of our clients. And more and more are asking for navigation in their presentation decks.

We have a short video here showing simple examples of interactive presentation techniques:

Animation triggers can reduce cognitive load

One of the great techniques we’ve used here is the animation trigger. A trigger animation has been set to hide a menu: this keeps the screen uncluttered and clean looking. When we click the menu icon, the full menu list appears and we can jump to a new section. Not having the menu there all the time will encourage the audience to focus on the actual visible content, and also gives the content space to “breathe”. This technique can also help to reduce cognitive overload in presentations too. We’re always keen to use presentation science!

 

If you’d like to transform your company presentations into a non-linear format, please give the team a call or drop us an email!

Award Winning Presentation Designer

Presentation Designer

Presentation Designer Marc Richard won the Presentation Guild Contest #002: “Makeover Makeover”

presentation-designer

 

We asked Marc how he went about approaching the contest brief. Here’s what he said:

“The words ‘Chalkboards, vintage & hand lettering’ can be dangerous territory for a presentation designer in PowerPoint!

Chalkboard textured backgrounds are much less common now that the 90s and 2000s and back then they were always a kitsch response to being stuck on computers, yearning to work with our hands! Vintage is a massive vague word that can mean 100 ‘shabby-chic’ things & hand lettering translates to custom installed fonts—not a PowerPoint forte…

Aside from this, the Presentation Guild brief was direct. It clearly stated the client needs and gave multiple examples of design for inspiration. These visual and written clues amount to half the job being done for a decent presentation designer. We acknowledged that the competition also asked for a working template.

Starting with the brand Magnolia and its logo, I separated the text from the marque to add motion to the falling petal on the cover slide to meet the current trend for animated logos, giving far stronger impact to an identity than a static printed logo can.

I used Segoe Script, one of the few handwritten typefaces to come bundled with Windows — important for anyone viewing your file not to experience PowerPoint substituting your chosen font for something default and losing all formatting.

The logo petal had a delicate, etched design and I matched this with gentle plant branch illustrations used on divider slides and then repeated on the following section for continuity.

Dark chalk background meant lots of use of light colours for contrast & the brief specified gold, grey & I used white […obviously, chalk!]

The client asked for spacious design, so I used PNG stock cosmetic images without backgrounds for interesting profiles & to avoid blocking out the chalk background. I added gentle shadows & translucent shapes to let the foreground hover over the background, adding to airiness. After this, I added in some motion animation to move elements around as you progress from divider slide to content, with simple fly-in & fade effects to finish it all off!”

If you’d like to see Presentation Designer Marc Richard’s winning entry – click here: Presentation Guild Makeover Makeover